On Turkeys (and Blogging)

turkeys,-winter_mmtn

Wild turkeys on a late, Carolina morning

Mom looked out the window last week and saw a flock of wild turkeys picking at the dormant grass in the front yard. The birds were oblivious to the humans standing behind the glass just a few feet away. By the time we’d stopped fiddling with cameras and technical mishaps (dead batteries,etc.), the flock had proceeded to the end of the driveway, just beyond the rough-scaled ‘Heritage’ river birch on their left.

The birds headed across the road to the field (it becomes full of Queen Anne’s lace and sweet peas in summer), then veered toward a dilapidated old barn with a metal roof that threatens to fly off into the sky every time the wind blows hard. As a child, I helped the neighbor boys set up a general store in that little barn. We had old glass bottles, clunky tin cans, and small boxes with lettering muted by dampness from the building’s dirt floor.  I always wanted to be the shopkeeper. The boys bought some of my make-believe groceries and goods to humor me.

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I’ve been a bit of a turkey with my blogging recently — wandering, picking at things, keeping my head low to the ground. Blogging requires commitment and time, and the ante gets upped pretty often, I think. An example is how many photos to provide for a posting. When I write about gardening, I feel compelled to include a lot of images, following the trend.  But it takes a lot of time to sort, re-size, and prepare photos for the web, then write a story, and do the behind-the-scenes work that makes the blog come together technically. Then, every few weeks a new app or social media platform surfaces, compelling bloggers to join in order to be relevant, or searchable, or whatever. So far, I’ve resisted, though I admire those who use those resources well.

For now, I need to be relevant to the social circle that’s in the flesh, needs my help, and doesn’t care if I’m search-engine optimized. In other words, blogging needs to take a back seat to parental and other responsibilities in the coming months.

When Meander Mountain first started, my goal was to have a very simple blog. For each posting, I wanted to show one or two photos that were nature-or-garden-related or that illustrated something  compelling or offbeat about traveling or life in Southern Appalachia (mostly east Tennessee and western North Carolina).  I want to re-commit to that approach, and also post more frequently — just without too many shoulds in my brain.

Too, I want to reach out more, to readers/other bloggers, who have made the past three M. Mountain years so enjoyable and worthwhile. For you, and for those who have made it to the end of this epistle, I am grateful. I look forward to staying in touch!

Cheers — to blogging and to wild turkeys,

DJ

Comments

  1. Those turkeys are quite a sight! We have wild turkeys in our area, but I’ve never seen any visit our farm. A couple of years ago, there were quite a few in a nearby town, and they caused a lot of public discussion about what to do about them, which was actually quite funny (I think they eventually were caught and moved to a local forest preserve).

    I admire the people who use all the different social media platforms, but it’s not for me, either. I enjoy Facebook to connect with family and old friends, and I’ve gotten into Pinterest, just to help myself remember things I see and want to try. But I wonder sometimes if all these people spend all day on the computer or attached to their phones! I enjoy blogging as a way of keeping a journal of my garden and meeting some like-minded “friends,” but I don’t care about stats and all of that. I’m glad you aren’t giving up blogging, DJ. I always enjoy reading about what’s going in your area, such a beautiful place.

  2. DJ Wilson says:

    I’ve heard about some places where wild turkeys have become very territorial and aggressive when they’ve taken up residence in a populated area. Most of the times I’ve seen them, they’re just passing through, peacefully. As for blogging, your blog is wonderful, Rose, social media or not. Maybe this year I’ll put aside my concerns about privacy and time drain and embrace some new ways of reaching out.